Before: Narrow stream with steep gradient in Munson After: Toe rock protection, live stakes and native shrubs were installed to reduce erosion. 115 linear feet stabilized.
   
Before: Rill erosion on same property as above  After:  Filter strip was installed and native grasses, sedges and forbs were planted to minimize sedimentation to adjacent stream (see above photo). 
   
Before: Stream channel was entrenched in Kirtland After: Stream banks were graded to a more natural slope, rock was installed for grade control and native seed mix planted. 565 linear feet stabilized. 
   
Before: Stream channel was incised and mowed up to the edge in Munson  After: Stream banks were graded to a more natural slope and grade control structures, live stakes and riparian seed mix were installed. 130 linear feet stabilized.
   
Before: Streambanks were eroded, lacked vegetation and were mowed to the edge in Kirtland After: Grade control structures, toe protection, native shrubs and native seed mix were installed. 325 linear feet stabilized.
   
Before:  Eroded streambank with eroded gabion-like structure in Munson After: Bendway weirs, toe protection, native shrubs and riparian seed mix were installed. 370 linear feet stabilized.
   
Before: Horse paddock before installation of heavy use pad in Munson After: A 3,600 square foot heavy use pad was installed to minimize erosion and sedimentation from a small horse operation 
Sediment impacts the ability for aquatic life to survive in the Chagrin River and transports phosphorous and other pollutants to Lake Erie. Sources of sediment in the Chagrin River watershed include streambank and streambed erosion, slope failure, construction, suspended solids carried from stormwater runoff, and runoff from agricultural lands in the watershed.
 
In 2012 the Great Lakes Commission awarded CRWP a Great Lakes Basin Program for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control grant to reduce sediment in the East Branch and Lower Main subwatersheds of the Chagrin River.  CRWP partnered with Lake and Geauga Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs) on this project to provide cost share assistance to landowners for the installation of streambank stabilization and agricultural best management practices, including filter strips, heavy use pads (all-weather paddocks), and fencing.
 
Through this project, Chagrin River Watershed Partners and Lake and Geauga Soil and Water Conservation Districts accomplished the following:
  • Completed ten fully engineered streambank stabilization and filter strip plans for residential properties in the City of Eastlake, City of Kirtland, and Munson Township.  More than $38,000 in design and engineering services were provided to residents through this grant.
  • Provided $107,015 in cost share funding to five residents in the City of Kirtland and Munson Township that proceeded with the installation of the proposed streambank stabilization and filter strip projects.  These residents contributed approximately $38,000 to fulfill the cost share requirements of this project.  CRWP contracted with Davey Resource Group to complete the design and construction of the streambank stabilization and filter strip projects.
  • Completed designs for heavy use pads and fencing for three agricultural properties in the Village of Waite Hill, City of Kirtland, and Munson Township with assistance from the Natural Resources Conservation Service,
  • Provided $3,756 in cost share funding to one Munson Township resident that proceeded with the installation of the proposed heavy use project for a residential horse operation.  This resident contributed an additional $3,756 to fulfill the cost share requirement of this project.

Project outcomes

  • Stabilized 1,505 linear feet of streambank.
  • Installed 0.04 acres of vegetated filter strip.
  • Installed 3,600 square feet of heavy use pad.
  • Prevented 3,932 tons of sediment from entering the Lower Main Branch of the Chagrin River over the life of the installed projects.
This project ended in September 2015.  Please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you have questions about this project.
 

This project was funded in part from a Great Lakes Basin Program for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control grant from the Great Lakes Commission.